Wednesday Jun 29
Written by Ben Pogany

The criteria:
--Must have at least 2 professional teams of the big four sports. (Sorry San Antonio)
--Both past and present performance is considered, with greater weight given to the present.
--Though championships and sustained competitiveness are the greatest indicators used, fan dedication is also a factor.  For instance, though the Cubs never win squat, Chicago is a far greater baseball city than, say, Tampa Bay, which has had some recent success but still can't get fans in the stadium.
--For all intents and purposes, Toronto is being included as an "American" city.
--Boston still gets the Pats even though they're technically from New England.  Dido for the Minneapolis and the Wild and Dallas and the Rangers.  And the whole Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim thing--just no.  If you say you're of Anaheim, you're of Anaheim.   
--Four teams is better than three, and five is better than four.  Still, having less teams isn't a deal breaker.
--Overall championships reflect all championships enjoyed by respective cities, including both current, defunct, and relocated teams.  For instance, LA claims eleven of the Lakers' championships, while Minneapolis, their city of origin, claims five.  New York gets the Dodgers' one World Series in Brooklyn, and five for the Giants of the Polo Grounds.  Baltimore compiled four championships before they were robbed of the Colts, while Philly bolsters its overall tally with five World Series from the early 20th century Philadelphia Athletics.  Other considerations include the Boston Braves, Cleveland Rams, LA Rams, Chicago Cardinals, Cleveland Bulldogs, Washington Senators, Boston Redskins, Milwaukee Braves, St Louis Hawks, Seattle Supersonics, and Philadelphia Warriors.

  1. Boston (Patriots, Red Sox, Celtics, Bruins) -- 9 championships since 2000 and 34 overall
  2. New York City (Yankees, Giants, Knicks, Rangers, Mets, Jets, Islanders, Nets) -- 4 championships since 2000 and 54 overall
  3. Chicago (Blackhawks, Cubs, Bulls, Bears, White Sox) -- 4 championships since 2000 and 28 overall
  4. Pittsburgh (Steelers, Pirates, Penguins) -- 4 championships since 2000 and 15 overall
  5. Los Angeles (Lakers, Dodgers, Clippers, Kings) -- 7 championships since 2000 and 20 overall
  6. Detroit (Tigers, Pistons, Lions, Red Wings) -- 3 championships since 2000 and 22 overall
  7. St. Louis (Cardinals, Rams, Blues) -- 2 championships since 2000 and 13 overall
  8. Philadelphia (Phillies, Eagles, 76ers, Flyers) -- 1 championship since 2000 and 15 overall
  9. San Francisco (49ers, Giants) -- 3 championships since 2000 and 8 overall
  10. Dallas (Cowboys, Mavericks, Rangers, Stars) -- 1 championship since 2000 and 7 overall
  11. Miami (Dolphins, Heat, Marlins) -- 4 championships since 2000 and 7 overall
  12. Denver (Broncos, Rockies, Nuggets, Avalanche) -- 2 championship since 2000 and 5 overall
  13. Cleveland (Browns, Cavaliers, Indians) -- 1 championships since 2000 and 13 overall
  14. Baltimore (Orioles, Ravens) -- 2 championships since 2000 and 9 overall
  15. Washington DC (Redskins, Capitals, Nationals, Wizards) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 6 overall
  16. Seattle (Seahawks, Mariners) -- 1 championships since 2000 and 2 overall
  17. Oakland (Warriors, Raiders, A's) -- 1 championships since 2000 and 8 overall
  18. Atlanta (Braves, Falcons, Hawks) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 1 overall
  19. Kansas City (Chiefs, Royals) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 3 overall
  20. Minneapolis (Vikings, Twins, Timberwolves, Wild) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 7 overall
  21. Phoenix (Diamondbacks, Cardinals, Suns, Coyotes) -- 1 championship since 2000 and 1 overall
  22. Toronto (Maple Leafs, Blue Jays, Raptors) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 15 overall
  23. Anaheim (Angels, Ducks) -- 2 championships since 2000 and 2 overall
  24. New Orleans (Saints, Pelicans) -- 1 championship since 2000 and 1 overall
  25. Indianapolis (Colts, Pacers) -- 1 championship since 2000 and 1 overall
  26. Tampa Bay (Rays, Lightning, Buccaneers) -- 2 championships since 2000 and 2 overall
  27. Cincinnati (Reds, Bengals) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 5 overall
  28. Houston (Texans, Rockets, Astros) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 2 overall
  29. Milwaukee (Bucks, Brewers) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 2 overall
  30. Charlotte (Panthers, Bobcats) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 0 overall
  31. Buffalo (Bills, Sabres) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 0 overall
  32. San Diego (Chargers, Padres) -- 0 championships since 2000 and 0 overall
  33. Nashville (Titans, Predators) --  0 championships since 2000 and 0 overall
*teams in bold designate defending champs, italics for defending conference champs

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To be sure, ESPN doesn't always go about things perfectly (see Tilt).  With 30 for 30, they nailed it.  The brainchild of "Sportsguy" Bill Simmons, the 30 for 30 series embarked on the tremendously ambitious undertaking of compiling 30 diverse directors to tell 30 diverse stories spanning the ESPN era.  Whether presenting often overlooked stories like the saga of Marcus Dupree in 'The Best that Never Was' or offering up fresh perspectives on widely known events like the OJ chase in ' July 17, 1994', 30 for 30 was a virtual crash course in a generation of sports history.  With a fresh round of docs under way, here is how they stack up so far from 'must see' to 'meh.'
  1. The Two Escobars by Jeff Zimbalist and Michael Zimbalist: The lives of soccer player Andrés Escobar and drug lord Pablo Escobar; the intertwining of crime and soccer in their native Colombia; and the connections between the murders of both men.
  2. The U by Billy Corben: The racial and cultural evolution of Miami during the 1980s as represented within the University of Miami football team.
  3. Once Brothers by NBA Entertainment: The story of Croatian Dražen Petrović and Serbian Vlade Divac, NBA players and Yugoslavian national teammates, and how upheaval in their homeland adversely and irretrievably affected their friendship.
  4. June 17, 1994 by Brett Morgen: Quick-cut archival montages capture the various sporting events on the day in question and the emotions they generated, with O. J. Simpson's run from the police overshadowing an NBA Finals game between the New York Knicks and Houston Rockets, the opening of the U.S.-hosted 1994 World Cup, the last-ever U.S. Open PGA tournament round for Arnold Palmer, Ken Griffey Jr. hitting another home run to add to his record-setting pace, and a parade in New York after the Rangers finally won the Stanley Cup.
  5. Bad Boys by Zak Levitt: A look back at the Detroit Pistons of the late 1980s and early 1990s.
  6. Brothers in Exile by Mario Diaz and MLB Productions: The story of Liván and Orlando Hernández, half-brothers who fled Cuba separately and became successful major-league pitchers.
  7. The Best That Never Was by Jonathan Hock: The 1981 recruiting of high school football player Marcus Dupree by multiple big-time college programs, his resulting career, and how his recruitment changed the recruiting process.
  8. Winning Time: Reggie Miller vs. The New York Knicks by Dan Klores: The impact of Reggie Miller on the New York Knicks in the 1990s, specifically focusing on the 1995 NBA Playoffs and Miller's interaction with Knicks fan Spike Lee.
  9. You Don't Know Bo by Michael Bonfiglio: A profile of Bo Jackson and how his feats in two sports (baseball and football) captured the public's imagination and made Jackson a cultural and marketing icon.
  10. Survive and Advance by Jonathan Hock: A look at the 1982-83 NC State Wolfpack men's basketball team's successful and improbable championship runs through the ACC and the NCAA tournaments.
  11. Unguarded by Johnathan Hock: The story of Chris Herren, a high school basketball star who played in the NBA, struggled with drug abuse his entire career and ultimately, found redemption and personal fulfillment through the game.
  12. The Fab Five by Jason Hehir: The story of the 1991 Michigan men's basketball recruiting class, called the Fab Five, one of whom (Chris Webber) was later involved in a notorious pay-for-play scandal.
  13. Catching Hell by Alex Gibney: The relationship between Chicago Cubs fans and Steve Bartman following Game 6 of the 2003 National League Championship Series
  14. The 16th Man by Clifford Bestall, Lori McCreary, and Morgan Freeman: How hosting (and winning) the 1995 Rugby World Cup and Nelson Mandela's support of the Springboks national team affected post-apartheid South Africa.
  15. The Band that Wouldn't Die by Barry Levinson: A profile of Baltimore's love affair with football and the Colts, focusing on the Colts Marching Band. After the Colts decamped for Indianapolis in 1984, the band remained in Baltimore and helped promote the eventual return of the NFL to the city.
  16. Fantastic Lies by Marina Zenovich: A 10-year retrospective of the Duke lacrosse case, in which a party thrown by members of the school's men's lacrosse team led to an accusation of rape — a claim that, though later proven to be false, ignited both a firestorm that damaged the school's prestige and an investigation that ruined careers.
  17. The Price of Gold by Nanette Burstein: A profile of a January 6, 1994 incident at the U.S. Figure Skating Championships, where an unknown attacker strikes entrant Nancy Kerrigan – an assailant that is later revealed to be a hit man hired by the ex-husband of Kerrigan's rival, Tonya Harding, as part of a plan to prevent Kerrigan from competing in the 1994 Winter Olympics. The Price of Gold originally went by the title Tonya and Nancy during production.
  18. I Hate Christian Laettner by Rory Karpf: A look at the life and basketball career of Christian Laettner and the intense dislikesome fans still harbor for the former Duke University and NBA star.
  19. This Magic Moment by Erin Leyden and Gentry Kirby: Examining the Orlando Magic teams of the mid-1990s with Shaquille O'Neal and Penny Hardaway, who not only ruled the NBA, but pop culture as well.
  20. Chasing Tyson by Steven Cantor: A look at how Evander Holyfield spent years (1989-91 & 1995-96) trying to arrange his first fight with Mike Tyson in an effort to gain the respect he knew he could only gain by defeating Tyson in the ring.
  21. 9.79* by Daniel Gordon: The 100-meter men's final at the 1988 Seoul Games was the first to feature four runners under 10 seconds. Within 48 hours, gold medalist Ben Johnson had tested positive for anabolic steroids and scandal trumped thrilling as the way to describe the race. More than two decades later, others from that race have been proven as performance drug abusers, and "the dirtiest race in history" still haunts the eight men who took part. The film looks at whatbrought the men to the starting line and what happened to them since.
  22. Elway to Marino by Ken Rodgers and NFL Films: A look at the six quarterbacks selected in the first round of the 1983 NFL Draft.
  23. Youngstown Boys by Jeff Zimbalist and Michael Zimbalist: The stories of two Ohio State football figures connected with Youngstown, Ohio—running back Maurice Clarett, a native, and coach Jim Tressel, former head coach at Youngstown State University—exploring their football exploits at Ohio State, including a national championship in 2002, and their scandalous exits from the school.
  24. Sole Man by Jon Weinbach and Dan Marks: A profile of Sonny Vaccaro, who rose from steel town roots in Pennsylvania to become an influential force in both basketball and the athletic shoe industry.
  25. Four Falls of Buffalo by Ken Rodgers: A profile of the Buffalo Bills teams of the early 1990s, when the franchise became the first team to play in — and lose — four consecutive Super Bowls.
  26. King's Ransom by Peter Berg: The 1988 trade of Wayne Gretzky from the Edmonton Oilers to the Los Angeles Kings and the effect it had on Gretzky, the fans in Edmonton, and the popularity of hockey in Southern California.
  27. Pony Express by Thaddeus D. Matula: The rise, fall, and rebirth of the SMU Mustangs football program, which received a 2-year "death penalty" for major infractions.
  28. Without Bias by Kirk Fraser: The death of Len Bias from a cocaine-induced heart attack, two days after Boston selected him in the 1986 NBA Draft, and its impact on casual drug use, especially by the sports community.
  29. Small Potatoes: Who Killed the USFL? by Mike Tollin: Fresh interviews and archival footage track the life and demise of the United States Football League in the mid 1980s.
  30. The U Part 2 by Billy Corben:  A sequel to The U profiles the Miami Hurricanes football program and its rise from scandal (and calls for the school to drop the sport) to a national championship, only to see new controversy after booster Nevin Shapiro is revealed to have given improper benefits to the program.
  31. Of Miracles and Men by Jonathan Hock: An exploration of the Miracle on Ice from the point of view of the defeated Soviet Union team.
  32. Believeland by Andy Billman: The film explores the Cleveland sports curse since the Cleveland Browns last brought a major pro sports world championship to Cleveland, beating the Baltimore Colts in the 1964 NFL Championship Game.
  33. Muhammad and Larry by Albert Maysles: A look at the October 1980 Muhammad Ali-Larry Holmes fight and its impact on both fighters, featuring fresh interviews with participants and previously unseen lead-up footage from both fighters' camps.
  34. Playing for the Mob by Joe Lavine and Cayman Grant: How Mafia associate Henry Hill orchestrated a point-shaving scheme involving Boston College basketball. Narrated by Ray Liotta, who portrayed Hill in Goodfellas.
  35. No Mas by Eric Drath: An inside look at the two boxing matches between Sugar Ray Leonard and Roberto Duran in the 1980s, with the help of boxing experts, family members and the two fighters themselves.
  36. When The Garden Was Eden by Michael Rapaport: A look back at the New York Knicks' championship teams of the 1970s.
  37. The Prince of Pennsylvania by Jesse Vile: An exploration of the turbulent relationship between Olympic wrestling brothers Mark and Dave Schultz and their eccentric benefactor, John du Pont, culminating in the murder of Dave by du Pont.
  38. The Announcement by Nelson George: The events and aftermath of former Los Angeles Lakers player Magic Johnson announcing he tested positive for HIV to the world.
  39. Big Shot by Kevin Connolly: The story of how young businessman John Spano struck a deal to purchase the New York Islanders in 1996, only to be later revealed as a fraud and being near financial insolvency.
  40. The Legend of Jimmy the Greek by Fritz Mitchell: The life of Jimmy "the Greek" Snyder, from his career as a Las Vegas bookmaker to his tenure on The NFL Today, from which he was fired in 1988.
  41. Requiem for the Big East by Ezra Edelman: A recollection of the original Big East Conference, from its simple beginnings and regional rivalries to its national prominence as one of the most successful college basketball leagues, and how it ended up fighting for its survival in the 2010s during conference realignment.
  42. The '85 Bears by Jason Hehir: A 30-year retrospective on the 1985 Chicago Bears, from how they were assembled to their swaggering, dominant run to Super Bowl victory.
  43. Broke by Billy Corben: Exploring the road to fortune in sports and the eventual detours to bankruptcy, as experienced by top athletes including Bernie Kosar, Andre Rison, Keith McCants, and Cliff Floyd.
  44. Hawaiian: The Legend of Eddie Aikau by Sam George: Chronicling the life of big wave surfer and lifeguard Eddie Aikau, whose tragic death served as inspiration to an entire spiritual movement.
  45. Free Spirits by Daniel H. Forer: The story of the colorful figures who made up the American Basketball Association's Spirits of St. Louis, and how Spirits owners Daniel and Ozzie Silna, with their team about to be left out in the ABA's merger with the NBA, managed to negotiate a deal that has allowed the brothers' involvement in pro basketball to continue to exist in a most unusual fashion.
  46. The Dotted Line by Morgan Spurlock: Sports agents Peter Greenberg and Eugene Lee are profiled with their clients Johan Santana, Jacquian Williams and Robert Hughes.
  47. The Real Rocky by Jeff Feuerzeig: A profile of Chuck Wepner, the original inspiration for Sylvester Stallone's Rocky Balboa. Wepner was left out of the “Rocky” glory, and his career took turn after strange turn as he worked to stay in the spotlight: he went on to fight Andre the Giant as “The Assassin” and twice boxed a 900 pound bear.
  48. Run Ricky Run by Sean Pamphilon and Royce Toni: A profile of Ricky Williams focuses on his brief 2004 departure from the NFL, when he sought self-redemption amidst media criticism and fresh rumors of marijuana use.
  49. Into the Wind by Steve Nash and Ezra Holland: Terry Fox's attempt to run across Canada in support of fundraising for cancer research captures the attention of his fellow Canadians and the world.
  50. Fernando Nation by Cruz Angeles: The euphoria created by Fernando Valenzuela's 1981 arrival with the Los Angeles Dodgers.
  51. Trojan War by Aaron Rahsaan Thomas: A profile of the rise and fall of USC Trojans football during Pete Carroll's coaching tenure in the 2000s.
  52. Brian and The Boz by Thaddeus D. Matula: The rise, fall, and post-football life of Brian Bosworth.
  53. The Day The Series Stopped by Ryan Fleck: A 25-year retrospective of the Loma Prieta earthquake, which struck just before the scheduled start of Game 3 of the 1989 World Series.
  54. Benji by Coodie and Chike: In 1984, 17-year-old Ben Wilson was a symbol of everything promising about Chicago: a beloved, sweet-natured youngster from the city's fabled South Side, and America's most talented basketball prospect. His senseless murder the day before his senior season sent ripples through Chicago and the nation.
  55. Roll Tide/War Eagle by Martin Khodabakhshian: The continuing rivalry between Auburn University and the University of Alabama. This is the story of the history between the two programs, the bad blood between its fans and how this intense rivalry came to a pinnacle, just when they ended up needing each other most.
  56. Tim Richmond: To the Limit by NASCAR Media Group and Rory Karpf: The career of NASCAR driver Tim Richmond, his flamboyant lifestyle, and his 1989 death from AIDS.
  57. Jordan Rides the Bus by Ron Shelton: Motivated by the dream his late father had for him, Michael Jordan retires from basketball and has a brief career in minor league baseball.
  58. Rand University by Marquis Daisy: An exploration of former NFL receiver Randy Moss and his humble (and humbling) origins in Rand, West Virginia.
  59. This Is What They Want by Brian Koppelman and David Levien:  The story of a 39-year-old Jimmy Connors and his unexpected and extraordinary underdog run at the 1991 U.S. Open, where he played as a wildcard entrant and reached the semifinals of the men's singles draw.
  60. Ghosts of Ole Miss by Fritz Mitchell: In 1962, the University of Mississippi campus erupted in violence over integration and swelled with pride over an unbeaten football team. Mississippi native Wright Thompson explores the tumultuous events that continue to shape the state 50 years later.
  61. Straight Outta L.A. by Ice Cube: The relationship between the Raiders and the minority fan base in Los Angeles during the team's 13 seasons in L.A. (1982-1994).
  62. Bernie and Ernie by Jason Hehir: A profile of Bernard King and Ernie Grunfeld, their decades-long friendship, and their on-court partnership on the University of Tennessee basketball team, better known as the "Ernie and Bernie Show".
  63. Slaying the Badger by John Dower: Examining the competitive nature that Greg LeMond and Bernard Hinault exhibited in the 1986 Tour de France; a film based on the book with the same name, written by Richard Moore.
  64. Goose by Kevin Shaw: The life of Reece “Goose” Tatum who played in Negro League baseball and was an original member of the legendary Harlem Globetrotters.
  65. Renée by Eric Drath: The life of transsexual athlete Renée Richards, who shocked the world with her entry into the 1977 U.S. Open.
  66. Angry Sky by Jeff Tremaine: The story of Nick Piantanida, a New Jersey pet store owner and truck driver whose love of parachuting and skydiving puts him on a quest to break the record for the highest recorded parachute jump.
  67. The Gospel According to Mac by Jim Podhoretz: A look at how Bill McCartney mixed two religions — college football and evangelical Christianity — while serving as head coach of the Colorado Buffaloes in the 1990s, a tenure that included a national championship.
  68. 26 Years: The Dewey Bozella Story by Jose Morales: The life of Dewey Bozella in his 26 years behind bars, where he found strength and purpose through boxing, becoming the light heavyweight champion of Sing Sing Prison. He made it a goal to be proven innocent and box professionally once he was released.
  69. Little Big Men by Al Szymanski: The Kirkland National Little League team's success at the 1982 Little League World Series (where they pulled off one of the biggest upsets in the event's history in the title game) and its after-effects.
  70. No Crossover: The Trial of Allen Iverson by Steve James: The 1993 trial of Hampton, Virginia, high-school athlete Allen Iverson, convicted for his role in a racially-tinged melee, and its impact on both the community and on Iverson's life.
  71. The Marinovich Project by Andrew Stephan and John Dorsey: The rise and fall of former USC and NFL quarterback Todd Marinovich is chronicled. The film focuses primarily on the complex relationship between Marinovich and his father.
  72. Silly Little Game by Adam Kurland and Lucas Jansen: Meeting at New York City's La Rotisserie Francaise, a group of writers and academics develop Rotisserie Fantasy baseball, only to see it take off in popularity and leave them behind.
  73. Right To Play by Frank Marshall: The story of Norwegian speed-skating gold medalist Johann Olav Koss, who founded the non-profit organization, Right to Play, which brings sports to children in third-world and war-torn countries.
  74. Guru of Go by Bill Couturié: Paul Westhead's coaching tenure at Loyola Marymount University (1985-1990) features his high-scoring run-and-gun offense and players such as Bo Kimble and Hank Gathers.
  75. There's No Place Like Home by Maura Mandt and Josh Swade: The story of one fan's obsessive quest to purchase James Naismith's original rules of basketball, perhaps the most important historical document in sports history, and to bring it "home" to Lawrence, Kansas, where Naismith taught and coached at the University of Kansas for more than 40 years.
  76. Four Days In October by Major League Baseball Productions: The remarkable comeback of the Boston Red Sox against the New York Yankees in the 2004 ALCS.
  77. The Birth of Big Air by Jeff Tremaine, Johnny Knoxville, and Spike Jonze: The life of Mat Hoffman and his 25 year career of advancing BMX riding, both creatively and promotionally.
  78. Charismatic By Steven Michaels, Joel Surnow, and Jonathan Koch: The run of Charismatic and its jockey, Chris Antley, at the 1999 Triple Crown.
  79. One Night in Vegas by Reggie Rock Bythewood: The friendship of boxer Mike Tyson and rapper Tupac Shakur and the night of September 7, 1996, when Shakur was murdered after attending the Tyson-Bruce Seldon fight in Las Vegas.
  80. The House of Steinbrenner by Barbara Kopple: The legacy of George Steinbrenner's ownership of the New York Yankees.
  81. Unmatched by Lisa Lax and Nancy Stern, with Hannah Storm: A look at the rivalry and friendship between tennis legends Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova.
  82. Marion Jones: Just Press Pause by John Singleton: The successful track and field career of Marion Jones, her 2007 admission of performance-enhancing drug use, and subsequent prison sentence.

*Summaries used courtesy of Wikipedia

Written by Ben Pogany
  1. Superman (first appearance: 1938)  Created by Jerry Siegal and Joe Shuster for Action Comics #1 (DC Comics).
  2. Mickey Mouse (1928)  Created by Walt Disney and Ub Iworks for Steamboat Willie.
  3. James Bond (1953)  Created by Ian Fleming for novel Casino Royale.
  4. Bugs Bunny (1940)  Created by Warner Bros and originally voiced by Mel Blanc.
  5. Batman (1939) Created by Bill Finger and Bob Kane for Detective Comics #27 (DC Comics).
  6. Dorothy Gale (1900)  Created by L. Frank Baum for novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Later portrayed by Judy Garland in the 1939 film adaptation.
  7. Darth Vader (1977) Created by George Lucas for Star Wars IV: A New Hope.
  8. The Tramp (1914)  Created and portrayed by Charlie Chaplin for Kid Auto Races at Venice.
  9. Peter Pan (1902)  Created by J.M. Barrie for novel The Little White Bird.
  10. Indiana Jones (1981)  Created by George Lucas for Raiders of the Lost Ark. Portrayed by Harrison Ford.
  11. Rocky Balboa (1976)  Created and portrayed by Sylvester Stallone for Rocky.
  12. Vito Corleone (1969) Created by Mario Puzo for novel The Godfather. Later portrayed by Marlon Brando and Robert DeNiro in Coppola's film adaptation.
  13. Han Solo (1977) Created by George Lucas for Star Wars IV: A New Hope. Portrayed most famously by Harrison Ford.
  14. Homer Simpson (1987)  Created by Matt Groening for The Tracey Ullman Show, later The Simpsons as voiced by Dan Castellaneta.
  15. Archie Bunker (1971) Created by Norman Lear for All in the Family. Portrayed by Carroll O'Connor.
  16. Norman Bates (1959) Created by Robert Bloch for novel Psycho.  Later portrayed by Anthony Perkins in Hitchcock's film adaptation.
  17. King Kong (1933)  Created by Edgar Wallace and Merian C Cooper for the film King Kong.
  18. Lucy Ricardo (1951) Portrayed by Lucille Ball for I Love Lucy.
  19. Spiderman (1962)  Created by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko for Amazing Fantasy #15 (Marvel Comics).
  20. Spock (1964)  Created by Gene Roddenberry for Star Trek. Portrayed most famously by Leonard Nimoy.
  21. Godzilla (1954) Created by Tomoyuki Tanaka, Ishiro Honda, and Eiji Tsubaraya for the film Godzilla.
  22. Winnie-the-Pooh (1924)  Created by A.A. Milne for verse book When We Were Young.
  23. Popeye (1929)  Created by E.C. Segar for comic strip Thimble Theater (King Features).
  24. Forrest Gump (1986)  Created by Winston Groom for novel Forrest Gump.  Later portrayed by Tom Hanks in Zemeckis' film adaptation.
  25. Hannibal Lector (1981)  Created by Thomas Harris for the novel Red Dragon. Portrayed most famously by Anthony Hopkins in the 1991 Jonathan Demme film The Silence of the Lambs.
  26. Big Bird (1969) Created by Jim Henson and portrayed by Carroll Spinney for Sesame Street.
  27. Tony Montana (1983)  Created by Oliver Stone for film Scarface.  Portrayed by Al Pacino.
  28. Tony Soprano (1999)  Created by David Chase for The Sopranos. Portrayed by James Gandolfini.
  29. The Terminator (1984)  Created by James Cameron and Gale Anne Hurd for The Terminator. Portrayed by Arnold Schwarzenegger.
  30. Charles Foster Kane (1941)  Created and portrayed by Orson Welles for Citizen Kane.
  31. Scarlett O'Hara (1936)  Created by Margaret Mitchell for the novel Gone With the Wind. Portrayed most famously by Vivien Leigh for the 1939 Victor Fleming film adaptation.
  32. Marty McFly (1985) Created by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale for Back to the Future. Portrayed by Michael J. Fox.
  33. Rick Blaine (1940)  Created by Murray Burnett and Joan Alison for the unproduced stage play Everybody Comes to Rick's. Later portrayed by Humphrey Bogart in Michael Curtiz's film adaptation Casablanca.
  34. Man With No Name (1964)  Created by Sergio Leone for A Fistful of Dollars, which was adapted from a ronin character in Kurosawa's Yojimbo (1961).  Portrayed by Clint Eastwood.
  35. Charlie Brown (1948)  Created by Charles M. Shultz for the comic strip L'il Folks; popularized two years later in Peanuts.
  36. E.T. (1982)  Created by Melissa Mathison for the film E.T.: the Extra-Terrestrial.
  37. Arthur Fonzarelli (1974)  Created by Bob Brunner for the show Happy Days. Portrayed by Henry Winkler.
  38. Holden Caulfield (1945) Created by J.D. Salinger for the Collier's story "I'm Crazy."  Reworked into the novel The Catcher in the Rye in 1951.
  39. Phillip Marlowe (1939)  Created by Raymond Chandler for the novel The Big Sleep.
  40. Jay Gatsby (1925)  Created by F. Scott Fitzgerald for the novel The Great Gatsby.
  41. Lassie (1938) Created by Eric Knight for a Saturday Evening Post story, later turned into the novel Lassie Come-Home in 1940, film adaptation in 1943, and long-running television show in 1954.  Most famously portrayed by the dog Pal.
  42. Fred Flintstone (1959)  Created by William Hanna and Joseph Barbera for The Flintstones. Voiced most notably by Alan Reed.
  43. Rooster Cogburn (1968)  Created by Charles Portis for the novel True Grit. Most famously portrayed by John Wayne in the 196
    9 film adaptation.
  44. Atticus Finch (1960)  Created by Harper Lee for the novel To Kill a Mockingbird.  (Appeared in the earlier work Go Set A Watchman, though this was not published until 2015)  Portrayed most famously by Gregory Peck in the Robert Mulligan film adaptation.
  45. Kermit the Frog (1955)  Created and performed by Jim Henson for the show Sam and Friends. Later popularized in Sesame Street (1969) and The Muppet Show (1976)
  46. George Bailey (1943)  Created by Phillip Van Doren Stern (then as George Pratt) for the short story The Greatest Gift. Later adapted into Capra's It's A Wonderful Life, starring James Stewart as the renamed George Bailey.
  47. Yoda (1980) Created by George Lucas for The Empire Strikes Back.
  48. Sam Malone (1982)  Created by Glen and Les Charles for the show Cheers.  Portrayed by Ted Danson.
  49. Harry Callahan (1971)  Created by Harry Julian Fink and R.M. Fink for the movie Dirty Harry.  Portrayed by Clint Eastwood.
  50. Tarzan (1912)  Created by Edgar Rice Burroughs for the novel Tarzan of the Apes.
  51. Zorro (1919)  Created by Johnston McCulley for the All-Story Weekly pulp magazine story The Curse of Capistrano. Later adapted to the Douglas Fairbanks' film The Mark of Zorro (1920).
  52. Moe, Larry, and Curly (1928)  Created by Ted Healy for the vaudeville act Ted Healy and his Stooges.
  53. Mary Poppins (1934)  Created by P.L. Travers for the children's book Mary Poppins.
  54. Ron Burgundy (2004)  Created by Will Ferrell and Adam McKay for the film Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy.  Portrayed by Will Ferrell.
  55. Mario (1981)  Created by Shigeru Miyamoto for the video game Donkey Kong.
  56. The Dude (1998)  Created by Ethan and Joel Coen for the film The Big Lebowski. Portrayed by Jeff Bridges.
  57. Gandalf (1937)  Created by J.R.R. Tolkien for the novel The Hobbit.
  58. The Joker (1940)  Created by Jerry Robinson, Bill Finger, and Bob Kane for Batman #1 (DC Comics)
  59. The Grinch (1957)  Created by Dr. Seuss for the story How the Grinch Stole Christmas!
  60. Willy Wonka (1964)  Created by Roald Dahl for the children's novel Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.
  61. The Hulk (1962)  Created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby for The Incredible Hulk #1 (Marvel Comics)
  62. Scooby-Doo (1969)  Created by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears for the show Scooby-Doo, Where Are You!
  63. George Costanza (1989)  Created by Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld for the show Seinfeld.  Portrayed by Jason Alexander.
  64. Jules Winfield (1994)  Created by Quentin Tarantino for the film Pulp Fiction. Portrayed by Samuel L. Jackson.
  65. Harry Potter (1997)  Created by J.K. Rowling for the novel Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone.
  66. Travis Bickle (1976)  Created by Paul Schrader for the film Taxi Driver. Portrayed by Robert De Niro.
  67. John McClane (1988)  Based on the character Detective Joe Leland, who was created by Roderick Thorp for the novel Nothing Lasts Forever. Later adapted into the John McTernan film Die Hard, starring Bruce Willis as McClane.
  68. Ellen Ripley (1979)  Created by Don O'cannon and Ronald Shusett for the film Alien.  Portrayed by Sigourney Weaver.
  69. Ralph Kramden (1951)  Created and portrayed by Jackie Gleason for "The Honeymooners," which became its own show in 1955.
  70. Edward Scissorhands (1990)  Created by Tim Burton for the film Edward Scissorhands.  Portrayed by Johnny Depp.
  71. Eric Cartman (1992)  Created by Trey Parker and Matt Stone for the animated short Jesus vs Frosty.  Later developed into the show South Park, which premiered in 1997.  Voiced by Trey Parker.
  72. Walter White (2008)  Created by Vince Gilligan for Breaking Bad.  Portrayed by Bryan Cranston.
  73. Cosmo Kramer (1989)  Created by Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld for Seinfeld.  Portrayed by Michael Richards.
  74. Freddy Krueger (1984)  Created by Wes Craven for the film A Nightmare on Elm Street. Most famously portrayed by Robert Englund.
  75. Shrek (1990)  Created by William Steig for the children's book Shrek! Later adapted into the 2001 film starring Mike Myers as the titular character.
  76. Captain America (1941)  Created by Joe Simon and Jack Kirby for Captain America Comics #1 (Marvel Comics)
  77. Bambi (1923)  Created by Felix Salten for the children's book Bambi, a Life in the Woods. Later adapted into the Disney film Bambi in 1942.
  78. Ronald McDonald (1963) Created by Williard Scott for a series of television spots.
  79. Waldo/Wally (1987) Created by Martin Hanford for the children's book Where's Wally? (Waldo in US edition)
  80. Frasier Crane (1984)  Created by Glen and Les Charles for Cheers.  Portrayed by Kelsey Grammar.
  81. Omar Little (2002)  Created by David Simon for The Wire. Portrayed by Michael K. Williams.
  82. Cliff Huxtable (1984)  Created and portrayed by Bill Cosby for The Cosby Show.
  83. Wolverine (1974)  Created by Roy Thomas, Len Wein, and John Romita Sr for The Incredible Hulk #180 (Marvel Comics)
  84. Jason Voorhees (1980)  Created by Victor Miller for the film Friday the 13th.
  85. Betty Boop (1930)  Created by Max Fleischer and the Grim Network for the cartoon Dizzy Dishes.
  86. Bilbo Baggins (1937)  Created by J.R.R. Tolkien for the novel The Hobbit.
  87. Tom Joad (1939)  Created by John Steinbeck for the novel The Grapes of Wrath. Later adapted into the 1940 John Ford film and portrayed by Henry Fonda.
  88. Tony Stark (Iron Man) (1963)  Created by Stan Lee, Larry Lieber, Don Heck and Jack Kirby for Tales of Suspense #39 (Marvel Comics)
  89. Porky Pig (1935)  Created by Friz Freleng for the animated short film I Haven't Got a Hat. Voiced most famously by Mel Blanc.
  90. Hawkeye Pierce (1968)  Created by Richard Hooker for the novel MASH: A Novel About Three Army Doctors. Famously portrayed by both Alan Alda and Donald Sutherland.
  91. Don Draper (2007)  Created by Matthew Weiner for the show Mad Men.  Portrayed by Jon Hamm.
  92. Jack Torrance (1977)  Created by Stephen King for the novel The Shining. Later adapted into the 1980 Stanley Kubrick film and portrayed by Jack Nicholson.
  93. Terry Malloy (1954)  Created by Budd Schulberg for the film On the Waterfront. Portrayed by Marlon Brando.
  94. Axel Foley (1984)  Created by Danilo Bach for the film Beverly Hills Cop.  Portrayed by Eddie Murphy.
  95. Tyler Durden (1996) Created by Chuck Palahniuk for the novel Fight Club.  Later adapted into the David Fincher film and portrayed by Brad Pitt.
  96. Holly Golightly (1958)  Created by Truman Capote for the novella Breakfast at Tiffany's.  Later adapted into the 1961 Blake Edwards films starring Audrey Hepburn as Holly.
  97. Patrick Bateman (1987)  Created by Bret Easton Ellis for the novel The Rules of Attraction. Most famously portrayed by Christian Bale in the 2000 film adaption of American Psycho.
  98. J.R. Ewing (1978)  Created by David Jacobs for the show Dallas.  Portrayed by Larry Hagman.
  99. Optimus Prime (1984)  Created by Dennis O'Neil for the Transformers toy line.
  100. Keyser Soze (1995)  Created by Christopher McQuarrie for the film The Usual Suspects.
Pre-20th Century: Santa Claus, Dracula, Robin Hood, Cinderella, Huckleberry Finn, Odysseus, Sherlock Holmes, Romeo and Juliet, Frankenstein, Prince Hamlet, Uncle Sam, Paul Bunyan, Tom Sawyer, Pinocchio, Oliver Twist, Snow White, Don Quixote, Rip Van Winkle, Ebenezer Scrooge, Anna Karenina, Ichabod Crane, John Henry, The Tooth Fairy, Br'er Rabbit, Long John Silver, The Mad Hatter
1) UCLA- Established: 1920--11 championships (10 in 12 years) and 18 Final Four appearances
Wins: 1,821  
Winning Percentage: .689
Last Championship: 1995
Defining Coach: John Wooden
Illustrious alumni:
  1. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
  2. Bill Walton
  3. Reggie Miller
  4. Gail Goodrich
  5. Russell Westbrook
  6. Jamaal Wilkes
  7. Kevin Love
  8. Marques Johnson
  9. Baron Davis
  10. Sidney Wicks
2) Kentucky- Established: 1903--8 championships and 17 Final Four appearances
Wins: 2,206  
Winning Percentage: .764  
Last Championship: 2012
Defining Coach: Adolph Rupp 
Illustrious alumni: 
  1. Dan Issel
  2. Cliff Hagan
  3. Frank Ramsey
  4. Anthony Davis
  5. Antoine Walker
  6. Rajon Rondo
  7. DeMarcus Cousins
  8. Jamal Mashburn
  9. John Wall
  10. Louie Dampier
*also Hall of Fame coach Pat Riley
3) UNC- Established: 1911--5 championships and 18 Final Four appearances
Wins: 2,168  
Winning Percentage: .737 
Last Championship: 2009
Defining Coach: Dean Smith 
Illustrious alumni:
  1. Michael Jordan
  2. Bob McAdoo
  3. James Worthy
  4. Larry Brown
  5. Billy Cunningham
  6. Vince Carter
  7. Rasheed Wallace
  8. Walter Davis
  9. Jerry Stackhouse
  10. Sam Perkins/Antawn Jamison/Brad Daugherty
4) Duke- Established: 1906--5 championships and 16 Final Four appearances
Wins: 2,085  
Winning Percentage: .707 
Last Championship: 2015
Defining Coach: Mike Krzyzewski 
Illustrious alumni: 
  1. Grant Hill
  2. Elton Brand
  3. Jeff Mullins
  4. Carlos Boozer
  5. Shane Battier
  6. Kyrie Irving
  7. Corey Maggette
  8. Luol Deng
  9. Mike Gminski
  10. Mike Dunleavy
5)Indiana- Established: 1901--5 championships and 8 Final Four appearances  
Wins: 1,778
Winning Percentage: .639  
Last Championship: 1987 
Defining Coach: Bob Knight  
Illustrious alumni:
  1. Isiah Thomas
  2. Walt Bellamy
  3. George McGinnis
  4. Dick Van Ardsdale
  5. Tom Van Ardsdale
6) Kansas- Established: 1899--3 championships and 14 Final Four appearances. 
Wins: 2,183  
Winning Percentage: .723  
Last Championship: 2008
Defining Coach: Phog Allen 
Illustrious alumni:
  1. Wilt Chamberlain
  2. Clyde Lovellette
  3. Paul Pierce
  4. Danny Manning
  5. Jojo White
  6. Andrew Wiggins
7) Louisville- Established: 1912--3 championships and 10 Final Four appearances
Wins: 1,778 
Winning Percentage: .666
Last Championship: 2013
Defining Coach: Rick Pitino
Illustrious alumni:
  1. Wes Unseld
  2. Junior Bridgeman
  3. Jack Coleman
  4. Rodney McCray
  5. Butch Beard
8) Connecticut- Established: 1901--4 championships and 5 Final Four appearances 
Wins: 1,609

Winning Percentage: .6
40
Last Championship: 2014
Defining Coach: Jim Calhoun 
Illustrious alumni:
  1. Ray Allen
  2. Richard Hamilton
  3. Clifford Robinson
  4. Caron Butler
  5. Rudy Gay
9) Michigan St- Established: 1899--2 championships and 9 Final Four appearances 
Wins: 1,635  
Winning Percentage: .606
Last Championship: 2000
Defining Coach: Tom Izzo 
Illustrious alumni:
  1. Magic Johnson
  2. Kevin Willis
  3. Zach Randolph
  4. Jason Richardson
  5. Steve Smith
10) Florida- Established: 1921--2 championships and 5 Final Four appearances
Wins: 1,363  
Winning Percentage: .559 
Last Championship: 2007
Defining Coach: Billy Donovan 
Illustrious alumni:
  1. Mike Miller
  2. Al Horford
  3. Joakim Noah
  4. Bradley Beal
  5. Chandler Parsons
  6. Jason Williams
  7. David Lee
  8. Vernon Maxwell

*The tournament to determine a national champion began with 8 teams in 1939, expanded to 16 in 1951, 32 in 1975, and 64 in 1985.
* Alumni are ranked according to eventual success on the professional level.
Written by Ben Pogany
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The 150 most essential people in the history of popular culture.
  1. Michael Jackson- They don't call him the King of Pop for nothing.  Michael is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame for three different acts spanning three generations.  Also, he made Thriller.  Thriller.
  2. Elvis Presley- Mike might be the King of Pop, but Elvis is just the straight up King.  If rock and roll has a birthdate, it probably has a something to do with this guy's hips.
  3. Babe Ruth- The man, the myth, the legend.  Even all these years later, no one even comes close to the Sultan of Swat.
  4. John Lennon-Tough to pick between Paul and John for the higher spot, but Lennon's activism and early death earn enough icon points to be the difference.
  5. Muhammad Ali-So much more than just a boxer, Ali just epitomizes the word icon.
  6. Bob Dylan- The voice of a generation and perhaps the greatest songwriter to ever pick up a guitar.
  7. Marilyn Monroe-Maybe the most beloved movie star ever, Monroe bedded the top athlete, playwright and politicians of her era.  Not too shabby.
  8. Michael Jordan-His Airness, the undisputed greatest sports marketing icon of all time.
  9. Paul McCartney-May be too low on this list.  Paul McCartney is pop music.
  10. Charlie Chaplin-For a solid twenty-year stretch, there was no more famous person on the entire planet than Charlie Chaplin.  Film classics like City Lights and The Gold Rush still hold up today.
  11. Marlon Brando-Brando basically invented acting as we know it today.
  12. Frank Sinatra-The dopest crooner that ever lived.
  13. Alfred Hitchcock-Arguably the greatest director of all time, Hitchcock was also a larger than life figure that brought the cameo to new heights.
  14. Johnny Carson-The guy for thirty years of late night television.
  15. Jackie Robinson-A true sports icon and a damn good second baseman to boot.
  16. David Bowie-If every one of Bowie's personas could have it's own vote, he'd probably be up here five times.
  17. Martin Scorsese-Hitchcock and Kubrick may be the two most important directors ever, but when it comes to modern film, no one's made more classics than Scorsese.
  18. Mickey Mantle-If you were a seven-year-old boy during the fifties and sixties, there was no one you dreamed about being more than The Mick.
  19. Bing Crosby-No recording artist more sold more than Bing in the 20th Century.
  20. Joe Dimaggio-The Yankee Clipper, his 56-game hit streak is one of the most iconic records in any sport.
  21. Steven Spielberg-He invented the blockbuster with Jaws, perfected it with E.T. and Jurassic Park, and ascended to new heights with Schindler's List and Saving Private Ryan.
  22. James Brown-The ultimate frontman and the all-time hardest working dude in show biz.
  23. Robert DeNiro-The Godfather.  Goodfellas.  Raging Bull. Taxi Driver.  A movie resume to rival any in history.
  24. Mary Pickford-The OG of pop culture icons, Pickford was the original movie star and possibly the first true celebrity.
  25. Mick Jagger-The most prolific frontman to ever rock an arena.
  26. Al Pacino-Before he started drifting into caricature mode in the late 90's, Pacino played some of the most iconic roles in history.  Michael Corleone and Tony Montana are the quintessential gangster roles of modern day.
  27. Harrison Ford-Han Solo and Indiana Jones.  Does it get any more iconic?
  28. Prince-When you can change your name to a symbol and the world just goes along with it, you know you've reached a whole other level of celebrity.
  29. Paul Newman-From playing Fast Eddie Felson to Cool Hand Luke to Butch Cassidy, there was no cooler star in sixies America than Paul Newman.
  30. Madonna
  31. Tom Hanks-Is there anyone more beloved in Hollywood right now than Tom Hanks?
  32. Stevie Wonder-Stevie signed with Motown at the age of 11 and has been killing it ever since.
  33. Joe Namath-The first true face of football, Namath's marketability was instrumental to the early success of the NFL.
  34. Humphrey Bogart-The ultimate leading man during Hollywood's golden age.
  35. Lucille Ball
  36. Louis Armstrong
  37. John Wayne
  38. Oprah Winfrey-Oprah isn't just a talk show host.  She's a media empire.
  39. Shirley Temple
  40. Eddie Murphy-Arguably the most important star in SNL history, Eddie single-handedly saved the show from extinction following the original cast exodus.
  41. Miles Davis-Miles birthed the cool in more ways than one.  No modern jazz artist looms larger.
  42. Richard Pryor-The father of modern stand-up, Pryor transformed his tragic upbringing into comedy gold.
  43. Bob Marley-10 million dorm room posters can't be wrong.
  44. David Letterman-A titan of late night, Letterman reinvented what was possible in comedy.
  45. Meryl Streep-Meryl Streep is to all other actresses what Tiger Woods is to all other black golfers.
  46. Mel Brooks-The rare five-tool comedian, Mel's writing, directing, and acting talents have earned him the grand slam of entertainment awards (Oscar, Emmy, Grammy, Tony).
  47. Walt Disney
  48. Bruce Lee-As synonymous with the Kung-Fu flick as any one man could be with a genre of movies.
  49. Bill Murray
  50. Elton John
  51. Denzel Washington
  52. Liz Taylor
  53. Bruce Springsteen
  54. Lorne Michaels
  55. Tony Bennett
  56. James Stewart
  57. Buddy Holly
  58. Hugh Hefner
  59. Andy Warhol
  60. Jayne Mansfield
  61. Tom Cruise
  62. Sammy Davis Jr
  63. Audrey Hepburn
  64. O.J. Simpson
  65. Groucho Marx
  66. Jack Nicklaus
  67. Jim Brown
  68. Kathryn Hepburn
  69. Jon Stewart
  70. Leonardo DiCaprio
  71. Tiger Woods
  72. Jerry Seinfeld
  73. Ray Charles
  74. Beyonce
  75. Bill Cosby
  76. Eric Clapton
  77. LeBron James
  78. Woody Allen
  79. Robert Redford
  80. Magic Johnson
  81. Jack Nicholson
  82. Joe Louis
  83. James Dean
  84. Sean Connery
  85. Ernest Hemingway
  86. Jerry Garcia
  87. Clark Gable
  88. Jimi Hendrix
  89. Johnny Cash
  90. Clint Eastwood
  91. Jim Morisson
  92. Whitney Houston
  93. Christopher Walken
  94. Will Ferrell
  95. Dr. Dre
  96. Joan Rivers
  97. Will Smith
  98. Wilt Chamberlain
  99. Justin Timberlake
  100. John Belushi
  101. Dick Clark
  102. William Shatner
  103. Jerry Lewis
  104. Michael J. Fox
  105. Jay-Z
  106. 2Pac
  107. Notorious BIG
  108. Arnold Schwarzenegger
  109. Rudolph Valentino
  110. Bo Jackson
  111. Christopher Reeve
  112. Kurt Cobain
  113. Taylor Swift
  114. Derek Jeter
  115. Arnold Palmer
  116. Larry David
  117. Jay Leno
  118. Stephen King
  119. Pamela Anderson
  120. Grace Kelly
  121. Evil Kinevil
  122. Bob Hope
  123. Hulk Hogan
  124. Carol Burnett
  125. Ted Danson
  126. Julia Louis-Dreyfus
  127. Cindy Crawford
  128. Mike Tyson
  129. Liberace
  130. Morgan Freeman
  131. Louis C.K.
  132. Samuel L. Jackson
  133. Brad Pitt
  134. George Clooney
  135. Dean Martin
  136. Judy Garland
  137. Wayne Gretzky
  138. Julia Roberts
  139. Stanley Kubrick
  140. Steve Martin
  141. Orson Welles
  142. Diana Ross
  143. Kanye West
  144. Sylvester Stallone
  145. Britney Spears
  146. Joe Montana
  147. Bono
  148. Shaquille O'Neal
  149. Alex Trebek
  150. George Carlin
Written by Ben Pogany
1) HBO: Launched in 1972
Top currently-running properties: Game of Thrones, The Leftovers, Last Week Tonight, Veep, Silicon Valley, True Detective, Girls, Togetherness
Top formerly-running properties: The Wire, The Sopranos, Curb Your Enthusiasm, The Larry Sanders Show, Deadwood, Six Feet Under, Sex in the City, Oz, Boardwalk Empire, Band of Brothers

2)  FX/FXX: Launched in 1994
Top currently-running properties: Fargo, Louie, The Americans, It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, American Horror Story, You're the Worst, Baskets, Tyrant, The Strain
Top formerly-running properties: The Shield, Justified, Sons of Anarchy, Rescue Me, Nip/Tuck

3)  Netflix: Launched in 1997
Top currently-running properties: Master of None, Making a Murderer, Narcos, Orange is the New Black, House of Cards, Bojack Horseman, Bloodline, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Jessica Jones, W/Bob & Dave

4)  Comedy Central: Launched in 1991
Top currently-running properties: The Daily Show, Inside Amy Schumer, South Park, Nathan For You, Broad City, The Nightly Show, Drunk History, Workaholics, Review, Tosh.0
Top formerly-running properties: Chappelle's Show, The Colbert Report, Key and Peele, The Man Show, Upright Citizen's Brigade

5)  AMC: Launched in 1984
Top currently-running properties: Better Call Saul, The Walking Dead, Halt and Catch Fire, Fear the Walking Dead, Hell on Wheels.
Top formerly-running properties: Breaking Bad, Mad Men

6)  Amazon Studios: Launched in 2013
Top currently-running properties: Transparent, The Man in the High Castle, Mozart in the Jungle

7)  Showtime: Launched in 1976
Top currently-running properties: Homeland, Ray Donovan, Episodes, Shameless, The Affair, Penny Dreadful, Masters of Sex, Billions
Top formerly-running properties: Dexter, Nurse Jackie, Californication, Weeds, The Tudors.

8) FOX: Launched in 1986
Top currently-running properties: Brooklyn Nine Nine, Family Guy, The Simpsons, Empire, The X-Files
Top formerly-running properties: Arrested Development, 24, That 70's Show, 90210, Melrose Place, In Living Color, Prison Break, House, Married...with Children, Party of Five, Undeclared.

9) CBS: Launched in 1941
Top currently-running properties: Big Bang Theory, NCIS, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, 60 Minutes, The Good Wife
Top formerly-running properties: CSI, Chicago Hope, Picket Fences, Everybody Loves Raymond, Murphy Brown
10) NBC: Launched in 1939
Top currently-running properties: Saturday Night Live, The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, The Blacklist, Meet the Press, Law & Order: SVU
Top formerly-running properties: Seinfeld, The West Wing, Cheers, Law and Order, Friends, Parks and Rec, ER, Friday Night Lights, The Office, Frasier, Freaks and Geeks, The Cosby Show, Homicide: Life on the Street, 30 Rock, L.A. Law

The Devil in the White City (2017)  Directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Leonardo Dicaprio.  An architect works to build up the 1893 Worlds Fair, while a serial killer uses the fair to attract and kill women.

Dunkirk (2017) Directed by Christopher Nolan and starring Tom Hardy, Cillian Murphy, and Mark Rylance. Tells the story of the Dunkirk evacuation, which took place at the beginning of World War II.

Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk (2016)  Directed by Ang Lee and starring Joe Alwyn.  An infantryman recounts the final hours before he and his fellow soldiers return to Iraq.

Legacy of Secrecy (???) Written and directed by David O. Russell.  Carlos Marcello and his possible involvement in the murder of JFK.

Blade Runner Sequel (2016) Directed by Denis Villenueve and starring Harrison Ford and Ryan Gosling.

Silence (2016) Directed by Martin Scorsese.  Starring Liam Neeson, Andrew Garfield and Ken Watanabe.  In the 17th century, two Jesuit priests face violence and persecution when they travel to Japan to locate their mentor and to spread the gospel of Christianity.

Strangers (???) Directed by David Fincher, screenplay by Ben Affleck and Gillian Flynn, starring Ben Affleck. (Remake of Hitchcock film Strangers on a Train)  A murder plot hatched by two men who meet on a train is considered to be a joke by one of them, and a dangerously real plan by the other.

Jackie (2017)  Directed by Pablo Larrain and starring Natalie Portman.  An account of the days of First Lady, Jaqueline Kennedy,  in the immediate aftermath of JFK's assassination in 1963.

The Magnificent Seven (2016) Directed by Antoine Fuqua and starring Denzel Washington, Chris Pratt, Matt Bomer and Ethan Hawke.  Seven gun men in the old west gradually come together to help a poor village against savage thieves.

Downsizing (2017) Directed by Alexander Payne and starring Matt Damon, Reese Witherspoon, Neil Patrick Harris, Alec Baldwin, and Jason Sudeikis.  A social satire in which a guy realizes he would have a better life if he were to shrink himself.

War Machine (2016 on Netflix) Directed by David Michod and starring Brad Pitt.  A satire of America's war with Afghanistan with a focus on the people running the campaign.

Enzo Ferrari (2017)  Directed by Michael Mann and starring Christian Bale and Noomi Rapace.  The life story of Italian sports car entrepreneur, Enzo Ferrari.

The Wizard of Lies (2016 on HBO) Directed by Barry Levinson and starring Robert De Nero and Michelle Pfeifer.  The story of Bernie Madoff and his Ponzi scheme.

Story of Your Life (2016)  Directed by Denis Villenueve and starring Amy Adams, Forest Whitaker, and Jeremy Renner.  Taking place after alien crafts land around the world, an expert linguist is recruited by the military to determine whether they come in peace or are a threat.

Live By Night (2017)  Directed by and starring Ben Affleck.  Based on the book by Dennis Lehane (Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone).  A story set in the Prohibition Era and centered around a group of individuals and their dealings in the world of organized crime.

Cortes (???) Directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Benicio de Toro.  Spanish Conquistador Hernán Cortés leads an expedition to bring down the Aztec Empire during the 15th Century.

T2: Trainspotting 2 (2017)  Directed by Danny Boyle and starring Ewan McGregor.  A sequel to Trainspotting.

The Trade (???) Directed by Jay Roach and written by Ben and Casey Affleck.  A chronicle of the 1970s scandal caused by New York Yankees Fritz Petterson and Mike Kekich, who admitted to swapping wives with one another.

Cicero (???) Directed by David Yates and starring Tom Hardy.  Focuses on Al Capone's rise to power moving from the slums of Brooklyn to the top of the food chain in prohibition-era Chicago.

Snowden (2016) Directed by Oliver Stone and starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Zachary Quinto.  CIA employee Edward Snowden leaks thousands of classified documents to the press.o.

Ballad of Richard Jewell (???)  Directed by Clint Eastwood and starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jonah Hill.  American security guard, Richard Jewell, heroically saves thousands of lives from an exploding bomb at the 1996 Olympics, but is unjustly vilified by journalists and the press who falsely report that he was a terrorist.

The True American (2016)  Directed by Kathryn Bigelow and starring Tom Hardy.  A Bangladeshi Air Force officer looking to make his way in the United States is shot by an American terrorist out to kill Muslims in the aftermath of September 11th.

Far Bright Star (???)  Directed by Casey Affleck and starring Joaquin Phoenix. Set in 1916, an aging cavalryman leads a team of men to hunt down the Mexican revolutionary Pancho Villa. However, after an ambush in which most of the men are killed, the cavalryman must struggle to survive in the desert.

Stronger (2016)  Directed by David Gordon Green and starring Jake Gyllenhaal.  A victim of the Boston Marathon bombing in 2013 helps the police track down the killers while struggling to recover from devastating trauma.

LBJ (2016) Directed by Rob Reiner an starring Woody Harrelson and Jennifer Jason-Leugh.  The story of U.S. President Lyndon Baines Johnson from his young days in West Texas to the White House.

Weightless (2016) Directed by Terrence Malik and starring Michael Fassbender, Natalie Portman, Benicio Del Toro, Rooney Mara, Christian Bale, Cate Blanchett, and Ryan Gosling.  Two intersecting love triangles. Obsession and betrayal set against the music scene in Austin, Texas.

The Kind One (???)  Directed by Ridley Scott.  The film is set in the 1930s Los Angeles and follows Danny Landon, an amnesiac who works for a violent mobster (a.k.a. "The Kind One"), while he falls in love with this man's girlfriend.

The Founder (2016)  Directed by John Lee Hancock and starring Michael Keaton, Linda Cardellini, Laura Dern, Patrick Wilson, and Nick Offerman.  The story of McDonald's founder, Ray Kroc.

Reykjavik (2016) Starring Michael Douglas.  A dramatization of the 1986 Reykjavik summit between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev.

The Snowman (2017)  Directed by Tomas Alfredson (Let the Right One in) and starring Michael Fassbender.  Detective Harry Hole investigates the disappearance of a woman whose pink scarf is found wrapped around an ominous-looking snowman.

Suburbicon (???)  Directed by George Clooney, written by the Coen Brothers, and starring Matt Damon, Julianne Moore, and Josh Brolin.  A crime mystery set in the 1950's.

The Current War (???) Starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Jake Gyllenhaal.  Electricity titans Thomas Edison and George Westinghouse compete to create a sustainable system and market it to the American people.

Free Fire (2106) Directed by Ben Wheatley and starring Brie Larson, Armie Hammer, and Cilian Murphy.  Set in Boston in 1978, a meeting in a deserted warehouse between two gangs turns into a shootout and a game of survival.

The Irishman (???) Directed by Martin Scorsese.  Starring Robert Deniro, Al Pacino, and Joe Pesci. A mob hit man recalls his possible involvement with the slaying of Jimmy Hoffa.

Boston Strangler (???)  Starring Casey Affleck.  A detective tries to solve the case of a notorious serial killer in Boston during the early 1960s.

Hands of Stone (2016) Starring Robert De Niro and Edgar Ramirez. The legendary Roberto Duran and his equally legendary trainer Ray Arcel change each other's lives.

Candy Store (2016)  Starring Robert De Niro, Keira Knightly and Omar Sy.  An undercover agent begins a new life as a beat cop in Brooklyn, but finds that his past life comes back to haunt him.

The Man Who Made it Snow (???) Directed by Antoine Fuqua and starring Jake Gyllenhaal.  The true story of Max Mermelstein, a Jewish hotel engineer, who transforms a small mom and pop drug organization into a billion-dollar enterprise.

Passengers (2016) Directed by Morten Tyldum and starring Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt.  A spacecraft traveling to a distant colony planet and transporting thousands of people has a malfunction in one of its sleep chambers. As a result, a single passenger is awakened 60 years early. Faced with the prospect of growing old and dying alone, he eventually decides to wake up a second passenger.

A Quiet Passion (2016) Directed by Terence Davies and starring Cynthia Nixon.  The story of American poet Emily Dickinson from her early days as a young schoolgirl to her later years as a reclusive, unrecognized artist.

Satchmo (2017)  Directed by and starring Forest Whitaker.  Screenplay by Ronald Bass (Rain Man). A chronicle of the life of jazz legend Louis Armstrong from his early years in New Orleans through his acclaimed career as a trumpeter and improvisational singer.

A Season in the Congo (???)  Directed by Joe Wright and starring Chiwetel Ejiofor.  A look at the events surrounding the Congo rebellion in 1960.

Blonde (2018) Directed by Andrew Dominic (Assassination of Jesse James) and starring Jessica Chastain.  A chronicle of the inner life of Marilyn Monroe.

Sinatra (???) Directed by Martin Scorsese. The life story of legendary singer and actor Frank Sinatra.

Thrilla in Manilla (2108) Directed by Ang Lee.

Untitled Josh Hamilton Project (???) Directed by Casey Affleck.  Baseball player Josh Hamilton, who was a top draft pick in 1999, hits rock bottom after suffering from a drug addiction that ruins his family life and career, only to clean-up his act and redeem himself with an unexpected comeback.

The Kidnapping Of Edgardo Mortara (2017)  Directed by Steven Spielberg and starring Mark Rylance.  Recounts the story of a young Jewish boy in Bologna, Italy in 1858 who, having been secretly baptized, is forcibly taken from his family to be raised as a Christian. His parents' struggle to free their son becomes part of a larger political battle that pits the Papacy against forces of democracy and Italian unification.

Untitled Mike Tyson Biopic (???) Directed by Martin Scorsese, written by Terrence Winter and starring Jamie Foxx.  A chronicle of champion boxer Mike Tyson's life.

Untitled Fashion Project (???)  Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson and starring Daniel Day Lewis.  Drama about the New York fashion industry in the 1950's.

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