Friday Oct 20
Written by Ben Pogany

Joe Torre- Aside of his hall-of-fame managerial career, Torre has the distinct honor of being the only player to start 500 games at catcher, first base, and third base. Torre started his career alongside his brother Frank, Hank Aaron, and Eddie Matthews on the Milwaukee Braves, where he would go on to win a catching gold glove and prompt Jack Kerouac to call him "the best catcher since Roy Campanella." After being traded to St. Louis for Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda, Torre would move to third base where in 1971 he would he hit .363 and drive in 137 runs en route to a NL MVP award. Torre wrapped up his career as a player-manager for the Mets. In his seventeen-year playing career, he would play in nine All-Star games. AVG: .297, HR: 252, RBI: 1,185.

Joe Girardi- Girardi caught 15 seasons in the majors, winning three World Series with the Yankees and appearing in an All-Star game in 2000. AVG: .267, Hits: 1,100, RBI: 422.

Mike Scioscia- The now skipper of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim spent his playing career under Tommy Lasorda's Los Angeles Dodgers, where he thrived as a catcher. Scioscia was lauded for his defense, in particular, his unrivaled talent for plate-blocking. Scioscia made two All-Star appearances and took home two World Series rings with the boys in blue. AVG: .259, HR: 68, RBI: 446.

Ozzie Guillen- Emerging from Venezuela, Guillen took the Major Leagues by storm, winning the 1985 AL Rookie of the Year Award as a shortstop. He was an All-Star in 1988, 1990, 1991, and won the Gold Glove Award in 1990. Guillén ranks among the White Sox all-time leaders in games played, hits, and at-bats. AVG: .264, Hits: 1764, RBI: 619.

Dusty Baker- Then, like today, Dusty Baker was never kind to pitchers. (See Mark Prior, Kerry Wood) Dusty compiled quite a resume in his sixteen-year playing career, including 2 All-Star selections, one World Series ring ('81 with the Dodgers), one Gold Glove, 2 Silver Slugger Awards, and the 1977 NLCS MVP honors. AVG: .278, HR: 242, RBI: 1,013.

Bud Black- In fifteen major league seasons, Black put together a very respectable pitching resume, winning over 120 games and capturing a World Series title in 1985. W:121, ERA: 3.84, SO: 1,039.

Terry Francona- After being named Most Outstanding Player in Arizona's 1980 College World Series Championship, Tito went on to have a largely unremarkable 10-year pro career, playing first base and outfield for five different ball clubs. AVG: .274, Hits: 474, RBI: 143.

Charlie Manuel- Though he appeared in five major league seasons in the early seventies, Charlie did not achieve a starting role until he began playing for the Yakult Swallows in Japan. Dubbed "Aka-Oni" (The Red Devil) by fans and teammates, Manuel became a star, enjoying seasons hitting 48, 42, 37, and 39 home runs. At a game against the Lotte Orions, he was hit in the face by a pitch, crushing his jaw. Told he needed at least two months to recover, Manuel returned after being sidelined for only 14 games, wearing a football helmet. The team went on to win the pennant. NPB statistics: AVG: .303, HR: 189, RBI: 491.

Ron Washington- Washington bounced around the majors for over a decade as a middle infielder. AVG: .261, Hits: 414, RBI 146.

Brad Mills- Before he was the newest skipper of the 'stros, Mills was just about the most unremarkable infielder for the now defunct Expos. In his 106 career games, just about the only thing Mills did of note was become Nolan Ryan's 3,509th career strikeout victim, moving the Express past Walter Johnson for first all-time. AVG: .256, HR:1, RBI: 12.

Bruce Bochy- In his decade of MLB service, Bochy caught for the Astros, Mets and Padres. AVG: .239, HR: 26, RBI: 93.

Tony La Russa- After suffering a shoulder injury while playing softball with friends, La Russa spent most of his career as a backup infielder for the A's, Braves, and Cubs. AVG: .199, Hits: 35, RBI: 7.

Bob Geren- After spending a decade in the minors, Geren finally made the big dance as a catcher for the New York Yankees. He sucked for a five years of his major league career. AVG: .233, Hits: 178, HR: 22.

Jim Tracy- Tracy played outfield for a couple of seasons with the Cubs before signing with Japan's Taiyo Whales. AVG: .249, HR: 3, Hits: 46.

Ron Gardenhire- The Twins' skipper battled through an injury-plagued five seasons as an infielder for the Mets before finally hanging up the cleats in 1985. AVG: .232, HR: 4, Hits: 165.

Jerry Manuel- From 1975-1982, Manuel bounced around the majors in a back-up infielder role, accumulating only 127 career at-bats over the seven year span. AVG: .150, HR: 3, RBI: 13

Lou Pinella- (18 seasons at left field) AB: 5867, AVG: .291, HR: 102, RBI: 766, 1972 All-Star and 1969 Rookie of the Year
Don Mattingly- (14 seasons at first and outfield)- Avg: .307, HR: 222, RBI: 1099, 6-time All-Star, 9-time Gold Glove winner, and the 1985 MVP.
Kirk Gibson- (17 seasons at outfield) AB: 5798, AVG: .268, HR: 255, RBI: 870, SB: 284, 1988 MVP
Don Zimmer- (12 seasons at third, short and second) AVG: .235, HR: 91, RBI: 352
Tommy Lasorda- (3 seasons pitching) IP: 58.1, ERA: 6.48, Record: 0-4
Sparky Anderson- (1 season at second) AB: 477, AVG: .218, R: 42
Bobby Valentine- (10 seasons at shortstop, outfield, and second) AB: 1698, BA: .260, HR: 12
Whitey Herzog- (8 seasons at outfield and first) AB: 1614, AVG: .257, HR: 20, RBI: 172
Larry Bowa- (16 seasons at shortstop) (AB: 8418, AVG: 260, SB: 318, 5-time All-Star and 2-time Gold Glove winner
Clint Hurdle- (10 seasons at right field, first, and catcher) AB: 1391, AVG: .259, HR: 32
Cito Gaston- (11 seasons at outfield) AB: 3120, AVG: .256, HR: 91, 1970 All-Star
Ned Yost- (6 seasons at catcher) AVG: .212, HR: 16, RBI: 64
Bob Melvin- (10 seasons at catcher) AB: 1955, AVG: .233, RBI: 212
Eric Wedge- (4 seasons at DH) AB: 86, H: 20, HR: 5
Mike Hargrove- (12 seasons at left field and first) AB: 5564, AVG: .290, RBI: 686, 1974 Rookie of the Year
Phil Garner- (16 seasons at second and third) AB: 6136, AVG: .260, SB: 225, 3-time All-Star
Ken Macha- (6 seasons at third) AB: 380, AVG: .258, HR: 1
Davey Johnson- (13 seasons at second and first) AB: 4797, AVG: .261, HR: 136, RBI: 609, 4-time All-Star

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Written by Josh Katz

Unless you’ve been hiding in the same cave as Osama Bin Laden lately, you are fully aware that Donovan McNabb was dealt to the Washington Dead Skins on Easter Sunday for a bag of practice balls and a stack of free cheese steak coupons. And if you’re in that cave, you’re probably a threat to the United States of America. As a New York Football Giants fan, I was stunned to hear this news, as I am sure most of the NFL community was.  For the past decade, Donovan McNabb has been synonymous with Philadelphia Eagles culture until he was cast away like Tom Hanks. He has given NFC foes headaches and night terrors with his mobility, poise and confidence. (See Below)

  • One Super Bowl trip (kudos to New England)
  • Four NFC Championship appearances
  • Numerous NFC East crowns
  • Six-time Pro-Bowler
  • 2004 NFC Offensive Player of the Year
  • 216 career touches to 100 career INTs
  • Over 32,000 career passing yards
  • 86.5 career QB rating
  • All sorts of Syracuse University records
  • A partridge and a pear tree

Sure, McNabb has had his ups and downs during his tenure in the City of Brotherly Love. He’s been oft injured as of late, criticized for changing his style of play (ask Rush Limbaugh), and destroyed for being unable to raise the Lombardi trophy. But in a league where greatness and continuity do not come along very much, he has been solid as a rock in a city that demands the most from its athletes. Having said that, it is common knowledge that Philadelphia fans are, for lack of a better term, a tough crowd to please. It is my opinion that the same fans that threw snowballs at Santa Claus, chanted “Let’s Go Eagles” at Phillies games and hurled batteries at Clinton Portis’ mother are the same blue-collar numb-skulls that ran Donovan McNabb out of town. I argue this sports fans: the city of Philadelphia made this trade, not Andy Reid or Jeffrey Lurie.



Now I understand that it may have been time for a change. Hell, I voted for Barack, so I get the idea of a fresh start. But it’s not the idea that the Birds traded the 33-year-old McNabb to begin a new era, but that they traded him within the division, to a bitter rival. It was as if to say, “Donovan, you have nothing left. You’re past your prime, so we have no problem lining up to play you – twice in a season, not including potential playoff matchups.” It appears that all the calls in to Philly sports radio and columns in the Philly tabloids finally ushered upper management to trade Donovan to Landover, Maryland. Oh, will they rue the day. Because now McNabb will be playing with something he hasn’t been playing with for a while -- a large chip on his broad shoulders. The same shoulders that carried the City of Philadelphia when no one else would. The same shoulders that dealt with Terrell Owens. The shoulders that took a pounding year after year from solid Cowboy and Giants teams. Lord knows I am no Redskins fan, but I personally hope the boys from DC pummel the Eagles when they play the Eagles. I hope McNabb throws for 450 yards, 4 touches and a perfect passer rating while Kevin “corn on the” Kolb goes 3-22 with 4 picks. Philadelphia fans should stick to what they know: Chase Utley, soft pretzels and Yuengling on tap. NOT trading away the franchise QB who made them relevant for so many years. So Donovan, pack up you Campbell’s chunky soup and strap on that red and yellow helmet. I hope that it’s the most comfortable helmet you’ve worn in a while.

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